Friday, November 24, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ In Exile in Amsterdam, Holland in 1609

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 17

The Engelse Kerk in the Begijnhof, Amsterdam

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

The Scrooby Pilgrims spent a year in Amsterdam after leaving England.  They followed Rev. Clyfton, who was the pastor of the All Saint’s church in Babworth where Bradford and Brewster first heard him preach about Separatism.  Babworth preached at Amsterdam’s Zuiderkerk, and is buried here.  Several other Separatists, such as Rev. Smyth from Gainsborough, were in Amsterdam, too. 

There is a neighborhood called the Begijnhof, which was first a close for Catholic lay nuns (known as "Beguines"), and their church was given to the English Protestants in 1607.  This English Reformed church “Engelse Kerk”  was where the Scrooby Pilgrims worshipped until Reverend Robinson led them to Leiden.   It seems that several factions of English Protestants squabbled over theology, and so Robinson led his flock of Separatists to the calm of Leiden.

The Begijnhof is a lovely little neighborhood.  You can’t hear the street noise inside this courtyard, and it is like stepping back into time.  Perhaps it even looks like it did in the early 17th century when the Pilgrims lived nearby?  It’s fun to imagine!

In the next post I will show you all the sites where the Pilgrims lived and worshipped in Leiden.


The entrance to the Begijnhof

The Begijnhof is a quiet courtyard from the 16th century inside Amsterdam

TO THE GLORY OF GOD IN CHRIST JESUS
THIS TABLET IS PLACED HERE BY A COMPANY OF THE
CLERGY OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA,
A LINEAL DESCENDANT OF THE CHURCH OF HOLLAND,
AS A TRIBUTE TO
THE PILGRIM FATHERS
WHO SETTLED FIRST IN THE CITY OF AMSTERDAM
IN HOLLAND, THE COUNTRY OF THEIR ASYLUM,
A SHINING EXEMPLAR OF CIVIL AND RELIGIOUS
LIBERTY, MANY OF WHOSE INSTITUTIONS
TRANSMITTED TO AMERICA THROUGH THE
ENGLISH PILGRIMS AND THE DUTCH WHO
SETTLED IN NEW YORK, HAVE GIVEN TO THE
NEW WORLD A DISTINCTIVE CHARACTER.
ERECTED A.D. 1927

THIS CHURCH IS BELIEVED
TO HAVE BEEN BUILT IN 1392.
IN 1607 IT WAS GIVEN TO
ENGLISH-SPEAKING PRESBYTERIANS
LIVING IN AMSTERDAM.
IT WAS ENLARGED IN 1665.
AND EXTENSIVE RESTORATION
WAS COMPLETED IN 1975
------------
AN INTERNATIONAL CHRISTIAN
COMMUNITY CONTINUES
TO WORSHIP HERE.

Over the door of the Engelse Kerk


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ In Exile in Amsterdam, Holland in 1609”,  Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 24, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-in-exile-in.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Happy Thanksgiving! My Mayflower Ancestors



I post this almost every year at Thanksgiving time.  This is the time of the year when people traditionally wondered "Did I have ancestors on the Mayflower?"  As we get closer to the year 2020, the 400th anniversary commemoration of the arrival of the Mayflower in New England, more and more people are asking that question.  It is estimated that over 20 million people around the world have an ancestor who arrived in Plymouth, Massachusetts in the year 1620 aboard the Mayflower.

You might be a Mayflower cousin, too!


For a list of Mayflower passengers who left descendants, click here:
https://www.themayflowersociety.org/the-pilgrims/the-pilgrims

Here are my own lineages in alphabetical order with Mayflower passenger ancestors in bold:

Isaac Allerton(abt 1586 – 1659)and Mary Norris (1587 – 1621-died during  the “starving time” in the first winter on Cape Cod)
Remember Allerton (abt 1614 – 1656) and Moses Maverick
Abigail Maverick and Samuel Ward
Martha Ward and John Tuthill
Martha Tuthill and Mark Haskell
Lucy Haskell and Jabez Treadwell
Nathaniel Treadwell and Mary Hovey
Jabez Treadwell and Betsey Jillings Homan
Eliza Ann Treadwell and Abijah Hitchings
Abijah Franklin Hitchings and Hannah Eliza Lewis
Arthur Treadwell Hitchings and Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Gertrude Matilda Hitchings and Stanley Elmer Allen (my maternal grandparents)

Edward Doty (abt 1599 – 1635) and Faith Clark
Desire Doty and Alexander Standish
Desire Standish and Nathan Weston
Nathan Weston and Hannah Everson
Zadoc Weston and Mary Clements
Matilda Weston and Joseph Edwin Healey
Mary Etta Healey and Peter Hoogerzeil
Florence Etta Hoogerzeil and Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Gertrude Matilda Hitchings and Stanley Elmer Allen (my maternal grandparents)

John Tilley (abt 1571- 1620) and Joan Hurst (abt 1568 – 1621) both died in “starving time”
Elizabeth Tilley (1607 – 1687) and John Howland (1592 – 1673)
Hope Howland and John Chipman
Hannah Chipman and Thomas Huckins
Hope Huckins and Benjamin Hamblin
Hannah Hamblin and Jonathan Crosby
Ebenezer Crosby and Elizabeth Robinson
Rebecca Crosby and Comfort Haley
Joseph Edwin Healey and Matilda Weston
Mary Etta Healey and Peter Hoogerzeil
Florence Etta Hoogerzeil and Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Gertrude Matilda Hitchings and Stanley Elmer Allen (my maternal grandparents)

John Tilley (abt 1571- 1620) and Joan Hurst (abt 1568 – 1621) both died in “starving time”
Elizabeth Tilley (1607 – 1687) and John Howland (1592 – 1673)
Desire Howland and John Gorham
Desire Gorham and John Hawes
Elizabeth Hawes and Thomas Daggett
Elizabeth Daggett and John Butler
Keziah Butler and Samuel Osborn
Samuel Osborn and Sarah Wass
Sarah Osborn and Charles Skinner
Ann Skinner and Thomas Ratchford Lyons
Isabella Lyons and Rev. Ingraham Ebenezer Bill
Caleb Rand Bill and Ann Margaret Bollman
Isabella Lyons Bill and Albert Munroe Wilkinson
Donald Munroe Wilkinson and Bertha Louise Roberts (my paternal grandparents)

George Soule ( abt 1593 – 1680) and Mary Beckett
John Soule and Rebecca Simonson
 Rebecca Soule and Edmund Weston
Nathan Weston and Desire Standish
Nathan Weston and Hannah Everson
Zadoc Weston and Mary Clements
Matilda Weston and Joseph Edwin Healey
Mary Etta Healey and Peter Hoogerzeil
Florence Etta Hoogerzeil and Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Gertrude Matilda Hitchings and Stanley Elmer Allen (my maternal grandparents)

Captain Myles Standish (abt 1584 – 1656) and Barbara Unknown
Alexander Standish and Desire Doty
Desire Standish and Nathan Weston
Nathan Weston and Hannah Everson
Zadoc Weston and Mary Clements
Matilda Weston and Joseph Edwin Healey
Mary Etta Healey and Peter Hoogerzeil
Florence Etta Hoogerzeil and Arthur Treadwell Hitchings
Gertrude Matilda Hitchings and Stanley Elmer Allen (my maternal grandparents)

For information about Mayflower passengers online see Caleb Johnson’s Mayflower History at

Some genealogy tips on finding Mayflower ancestors (a blog post from 2015 "Ten Things to Know about Researching a Pilgrim in your Family Tree")
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/11/ten-things-to-know-about-researching.html

----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "My Mayflower Ancestors", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 23, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/happy-thanksgiving-my-mayflower.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A church in England with ties to the Mayflower

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in England.


Do you know the location of weathervane post #338?  Scroll down to find the answer.




"London Borough of Southward
Sailing of the Mayflower
In 1620 the Mayflower sailed from
Rotherhithe on the first stage of
its epic voyage to America
In command was Captain
Christopher Jones
of Rotherhithe
Voted by the People"


This weathervane is on top of the steeple of St. Mary the Virgin in Rotherhithe, London, England.  This is the church attended by Captain Christopher Jones of the Mayflower.  He was buried here in 1623, a few years after returning from New England.  The weathervane is a simple banner, and probably dates from 1714 - 1715 when it was rebuilt, and not contemporary to when Capt. Jones attended services.  There has been a church here in Rotherhithe since the 1200s. 


St. Mary's Church, Rotherhithe, London:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary%27s_Church,_Rotherhithe  



-------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A church in England with ties to the Mayflower", Nutfield Genealogy,  posted November 22,  2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/weathervane-wednesday-church-in-england.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Edward Paige of Boston, buried in Leyden, Holland, 1680

HERE LIETH BURIED EDWARD PAIGE
ONELY SON OF NICOLAS AND ANNA PAIGE
BORNE AT BOSTON, IN NEW ENGLAND,
FEB. 20, 1662 DIED IN LEYDEN NOV. 1
1680, N.S.


I photographed this unusual tombstone on the floor of the St. Pieterskirk in Leiden, The Netherlands in October when I was on the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour.  This church is of great interest to Americans and to Mayflower Descendants because Rev. John Robinson (1576 – 1626), my 10th great grandfather, ministered here to his flock of English Separatists.  Many of these members became known as “The Pilgrim Fathers” when they left Holland and went to Plymouth in New England on board the Mayflower in 1620.  Rev. Robinson stayed behind to tend to his congregation and is buried under the floor of St. Pieterskirk, along with some of the children and family members of the Pilgrims.

In another corner of the church we found this tombstone in the floor.  Since it mentioned that Edward Paige was born in Boston, I was intrigued and took the photograph so I could look him up for a Tombstone Tuesday blog post.  This is what I have found.

In the book Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley, by Cuyler Reynolds and William Richard Cutter, 1914, Volume 3, page 1362, “Nicholas Paige, of Rumney Marsh [now the city of Revere, Massachusetts], colonel of the Second Suffolk County Regiment, and commander of the artillery company (Ancient and Honorable).  He was not traceable in this country before 1660, when he was at Boston.  He married Anna Keayne (widow of Edward Lane), daughter of Benjamine Keayne, first commander of the artillery company, 1638, and freeman, 1639.  Benjamin Keayne married Sarah, daughter of Governor Thomas Dudley, and about 1645, returned to England and never came back.  During some repairs which were made in 1863 upon the University Library building, standing between the klog-steeg and the Sheepmakers-steeg, on the east side of the Rapenburg, in the city of Leyden, Holland, six memorial stones were found, about two feet under the wooden floor of the room on the basement floor, which had formerly been occupied as a chapel.  The stones had probably formed a part of the original pavement of the chapel. In position under the stones and near to them were found parts of twelve bodies. On one of the stones was carved: “Here lieth buried Edward Paige, onely son of Nicolas and Anna Paige, born at Boston, in New England, February 20, 1662, died in Leyden, November 1, 1680”.”

In the New England Historical and Genealogical Register and Antiquarian Journal, 1869, Volume XXII, pages 266 – 269,  there is an article “Six Memorial Inscriptions of Englishmen, buried in the chapel once occupied by the Scottish Church in Leyden, with Notes” by Rev. Henry M. Dexter, DD., which describes the chapel in the university and the six tombstones.  It doesn’t explain how the tombstone was removed to St. Pieterskirk in Leiden.


There is another article which describes Edward Paige of Boston’s tombstone in The Bay State Monthly, 1889, “The Pilgrims in Leyden” by Rev. Henry M. Dexter in The Bay State Monthly, Volume 1, pages 49 – 61. 

------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Edward Paige of Boston, buried in Leyden, Holland, 1680", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 21, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/tombstone-tuesday-edward-paige-of.html: accessed [access date]). 

Monday, November 20, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ 1608 Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 16

The Pilgrims Memorial, Immingham

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

In the last few posts of this series the Separatist members of the Scrooby congregation were arrested at Fishtoft, and imprisoned at Boston.  This was a very perilous part of the Pilgrim story.  They went back to their homes after being released from Boston, but in 1608 they tried another attempt to escape to Holland. 

Scrooby Separatists found themselvese at a creek in Immingham near the Humber River.  While the women and children went ashore because of bad weather, a contingent of armed men arrived to arrest the whole bunch of them.  The captain of the ship panicked and set sail for Holland, taking all the men.  The women and children were arrested, but the public outcry against this was so great that they were freed and eventually joined their husbands and menfolk in Holland.

In 1924 a memorial was placed along the creek to mark this location where the Pilgrims set sail for Holland.  This really was the start of their new journey to find a permanent home where they would be accepted.  Over the years the creek and marsh were redeveloped into industrial properties, and the memorial was moved to a small park in the town of Immingham.  This is where we all posed for photos in front of the memorial.

The sign says the memorial was made out of “Plymouth Rock”.  I think they used some rock from Plymouth, Massachusetts, but not “The Plymouth Rock”!   The local town here is very proud of their Pilgrim history.  There was a street named after the Pilgrims, and the local soccer team is the Immingham Pilgrims.


After visiting Immingham, we took the modern ferry from Harwich to the Hook of Holland, over the North Sea.  The ferry ride was about seven hours.  I can't imagine how long it took the Pilgrims to cross from England to Holland in 1608.  Or how primitive the conditions were.  We had a fine crossing in calm seas, but I know the North Sea can be rough and dangerous.  The next stop for the Pilgrims would be Amsterdam in the Netherlands. They ended up staying 13 years in Holland. Stay tuned for the next post!



FROM THIS CREEK
THE PILGRIM FATHERS
FIRST LEFT ENGLAND IN 1608
IN SEARCH OF RELIGIOUS LIBERTY
THE GRANITE TOP STONE WAS
TAKEN FROM PLYMOUTH ROCK MASS
AND PRESENTED BY THE 
SULGRAVE INSTITUTION OF USA
THIS MEMORIAL WAS ERECTED
BY THE ANGLO-AMERICAN SOCIETY
OF HULL
1924

This monument was removed from its
original site, known as Immingham Creek
and re-erected in this position in May 1970.
It was rededicated on Sunday 20th July
2008 to mark the 400th anniversary of
The Separatists (later known as The
Pilgrim Fathers) leaving England
from Immingham to Leiden, Holland

PILGRIM FATHERS
IMMINGHAM TO HOLLAND
1609
TO PLYMOUTH ROCK
NEW ENGLAND
1620



Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-fishtoft.html

Part 15 of this series "Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrims were jailed":


----------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ 1608 Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 20, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-1608-immingham.html: accessed [access date]). 

Sunday, November 19, 2017

How to Walk in the Footsteps of the Pilgrims

The 2017 GSMD Historic Sites Tour at Scrooby Manor
You can walk in the footsteps of the Pilgrims, too!

I’ve been blogging about my tour of England and The Netherlands with the General Society of Mayflower Descendants’ Historic Sites Tour.  Many people have commented on my blog posts, Facebook pages and by email, asking me how to take a similar tour.  Well, folk, you are in luck!  Because the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the Pilgrim in Plymouth, Massachusetts (in the year 1620) is coming so soon, there are many opportunities to take a tour like I took in September.

Option #1)  The tour I took was the “Historic Sites Tour” offered by the Mayflower Society.  Every few years this tour is organized by the Historic Sites Committee.  You can read their page on the official GSMD website here:  https://www.themayflowersociety.org/committees/historic-sites  at the moment, there is no new tour being offered, but stay tuned to this website for more information coming before 2020. 

Option #2)  The New England Historic Genealogical Society will be offering at least 4 different tours in the years before 2020!  Here are the four options
A.)  “Pilgrim Roots of the Great Migration” August 7 – 15, 2018 lead by Robert Charles Anderson
B.)  “Pilgrim Escape to Leiden” 2019  (Leiden, Delfshaven and Amsterdam)
C.)  “Mayflower Embarkation” Spring 2020 (Plymouth, Southampton, London, Harwich, Canterbury)
D.)  “New England Sojourn” June and September 2020  (in Massachusetts to Plymouth, Provincetown, Boston, Duxbury, etc)

Option #3)   Check in with the Plymouth 400 webpage for tours as we near the year 2020.  This is the organization planning a huge commemoration in Plymouth, Massachusetts and other towns nearby. Their webpage is http://www.plymouth400inc.org/   

Option #4)   Just like the town of Plymouth, Massachusetts--  Plymouth in England is also planning a big commemoration of the events in 1620.  Their official webpage is http://www.mayflower400uk.org/ where you can find a link “Travel Trade” http://www.mayflower400uk.org/travel-trade/ for organized tours.

Option #5)  You can take a tour with Sue Allan, the author and guide with whom we met on our tour in Scrooby Manor, Austerfield and Babworth.  You can read more about her tours at her webpage:  http://mayflowermaid.com/mayflower_pilgrim_tours  

Good luck, and have fun!

2017 GSMD Historic Sites tour participants at the
ferry port in Harwich, heading to the Hook of Holland


-----------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "How to Walk in the Footsteps of the Pilgrims", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 19, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/how-to-walk-in-footsteps-of-pilgrims.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ Pitman of Marblehead, Massachusetts



PITMAN / PITTMAN / PETMAN / PICKMAN

Thomas Pitman, my 10th great grandfather, was born about 1614 in England. His origins and his parents are unknown, but he had a brother named John Pitman who might have come over with him at the same time.   It is unknown when he first arrived in Salem, Massachusetts, and he lived in the part of town that became Marblehead.  He married a woman named Joan or Jane and had six children recorded in Salem.

Thomas Pitman made a will in 1694 and died that year.  He left his house to his son Thomas Pitman, and the rest of his estate to his daughters Sarah Dodd and Mary Fortune, and to the children of his brother John.  His house and land were sold on 21 March 1716/17 to Reverend John Barnard of Marblehead, who took down the house. [Essex Registry of Deeds, book 32, leaf 98].  Thomas Pitman, Jr. was married twice, first to Mary Dennis, and second to Margaret (Gould) Stilson, my 8th great grandmother in another lineage.  Margaret was taken prisoner by Indians in Maine who had killed her husband and child in 1689. She was taken to Quebec with her daughter Mary, and ransomed back in 1695.

The daughter of Thomas Pitman and Joan, Mary (Pitman) Fortune, is my 9th great grandmother.  She married Elias Fortune and had thirteen children.  See the lineage below.

For more information on Thomas Pitman see the book Marblehead in the Year 1700 by Sidney Perley, 1910, pages 36 and 61.  This book has been digitized and is available online at the Marblehead Museum website http://marbleheadmuseum.org/Marblehead-1700.pdf  

Also, Sidney A. Merriam, "Notes of Pitman Documents", The American Genealogist, Volume 18, pages 17 - 19. 

My PITMAN Genealogy:

Generation 1:  Thomas Pitman, born about 1614 in England, died July 1694 in Marblehead, Massachusetts; married about 1643 in Salem, Massachusetts to Joan or Jane Unknown. Six children born in Salem:
1.  Joseph Pitman, born about 1644– no further information
2.  Sarah Pitman, born about 1646, married Thomas Dodd
3.  Mary Pitman, born about 1648 , (see below – my 9th great grandmother)
4. Elizabeth Pitman, born about 1650, married Henry Russell
5.  Thomas Pitman, born about 1652, married first Mary Dennis, married second to Margaret Gould, widow of James Stilson, (my 8th great grandparents)
6.  John Pitman, born about 1660, died 1696 in Barbadoes, m. Charity Gale

Generation 2: Mary Pitman, born about 1648 in Salem, died 1734 in Marblehead; married about 1669 to Elias Fortune.  He was born about 1640 in England and died November 1705 in Marblehead. Thirteen chidren.

Generation 3:  Mary Fortune m. Samuel Hoyle
Generation 4: Mary Hoyle m. Peter Homan
Generation 5: William Homan m. Elizabeth Unknown
Generation 6:  Thomas Homan m. Tabitha Glover
Generation 7: Betsey Jillings Homan m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 8: Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 9: Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 10: Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 11: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

------------------------------------


Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ Pitman of Marblehead, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 18, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/surname-saturday-pitman-of-marblehead.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, November 17, 2017

Along The Pilgrim Trail ~ Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrim Fathers were Jailed

Along the Pilgrim Trail,  Part 15


IN THESE CELLS
WILLIAM BRADFORD       WILLIAM BREWSTER
and others afterwards known as
THE PILGRIM FATHERS
WERE IMPRISONED
on the 23rd September 1607
after attempting to escape to
religious freedom


Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

Boston, Lincolnshire has many connections to the Mayflower passengers and to the Great Migration of Puritans to New England.  Our first stop in Boston was to the Guildhall.  In yesterday's post I described how the Scrooby Separatists were arrested at Fishtoft in 1607, and taken to the jail in the Boston Guildhall.  Today's post picks up on the rest of that story.

Boston Guildhall

The Boston Guildhall dates from the late 1300s. It was built for the Guild of St. Mary the Blessed Virgin.  This guild sold indulgences, which provided members with priests to say masses for the deceased for their eternal salvation. Members gave money and land for these indulgences. This practice made the guild very wealthy and influential in the middle ages, and the city of Boston prospered.  But it was also a corrupt system that the Protestants wanted abolished.

After the Guild of St. Mary was abolished, the Guildhall was used for civic purposes, such as the Quarter Session court  where the Scrooby Separatist men were jailed and held for trial. The men were imprisoned a month and since there were many Puritans in town, most of the men were released and returned home to Nottinghamshire and North Lincolnshire.  Seven Scrooby leaders, which must have included Brewster and Bradford were held in jail for the high court. It is unknown if that court session was ever held because the men were free to return with the others soon after.

But, they would try to reach Holland the following year in 1608. Stayed tuned for more about the escape to The Netherlands in the next blog post!

St. Botolph's Church

We also visited St. Botolph's church while we were in Boston. The first church here was built on the site of Botolph's own monastery in 654.  In the 14th century a grand new church was built here to reflect how prosperous Boston had become, thanks to the wealthy Guildhall. It is known as "The Stump" or "The Boston Stump" because of it's tall, 272 foot tower which appears to be unfinished by a spire. The church tower can be seen for miles because the area around the city of Boston is a flat watershed known as "The Fens".

In the 1600s, Rev. John Cotton began preaching his non-conformist ideas at St. Botolph's church.  He was very popular, and gained thousands of followers, including many families of gentry who removed to Boston to be part of his parish.  In 1630 Thomas Dudley, Simon Bradstreet and other Boston leaders removed to Massachusetts with a large number of his congregation, as part of the Winthrop Fleet.  Rev. John Cotton himself removed to Boston, Massachusetts in 1633.

"1630. John Cotton bids farewell to his parishoners on the Arbella"
a window inside St. Botolph's church




The Rev. John Cotton chapel inside St. Botolph's church



The Cotton Chapel inside St. Botolph's church is named for Rev. John Cotton.  There is a "Puritan Pathway" outside of the church with memorial markers for famous Puritans who left Boston, Lincolnshire for Boston, Massachusetts.  You might recognize some of these 12 names - Anne Hutchinson, Lady Arbella Johnson, John Winthrop, and Thomas Leverett (all were influential and important early settlers in the Massachusetts Bay Colony).  In 1999 the Partnership of Historic Bostons was established to help preserve and publicize the relationship between the two Bostons.

"FOR WE MUST CONSIDER THAT WE SHALL BE
AS A CITY UPON A HILL.
THE EYES OF ALL PEOPLE ARE UPON US"
GOVERNOR JOHN WINTHROP
ON BOARD THE "ARBELLA"
1630


For more information:

The Partnership of Historic Bostons:  http://www.historicbostons.com/

The Boston Guildhall:   http://www.bostonguildhall.co.uk/

St. Botolph's Church: https://parish-of-boston.org.uk/church/st-botolphs/

A six minute video of the Puritan Path in Boston, Lincolnshire:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_K_R_u4L5Fk 

Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire”:



Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey":

Part 7 of this series "Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire":

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-fishtoft.html

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrim Fathers were Jailed", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 17, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-boston-lincolnshire.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were Betrayed!

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 14

The Pilgrim Monument at Fishtoft

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

In 1607 the Scrooby congregation of Separatists decided to leave England due to the persecutions of many of their members. They decided to go to Holland, where they could worship without fear.

The Scrooby Separatists hired a barge to leave from the small village of Fishtoft, Lincolnshire which would take them to a ship over the North Sea to Holland.  Fishtoft is 60 miles from Scrooby, a village in the tidal marshes off The Haven ( the River Witham which drains the Fens).  The barge was to leave a small brook or creek known as Scotia creek.  From here you can see the tower of St. Botolph's church in nearby Boston, Lincolnshire.

Once the Separatists boarded the barge, the group was seized by officers who put them into open boats and carried them back upriver to Boston.  The men and women were searched bodily.  Money, books and possessions were seized.  The men were arrested and imprisoned in the Guildhall.

Stay tuned for the next episode to find out what happened next in Boston!

Near this place in September 1607
those later known as the
Pilgrim Fathers
were thwarted in their first attempt to sail
to find religious freedom across the seas.

Memorial re-worded by
the generous gift of the National Association of
Congregational Christian Churches
and the First Congregational Church of Wauwatosa,
WI, USA - 2009

By the way, according to Wikipedia, the original wording on this monument used to read "Near this place in September 1607 those later known as "The Pilgrim Fathers" made their first attempt to find religious freedom across the seas.  Erected 1957".  It was erected in 1957 on the 350th anniversary of the event.

Mayflower descendants along the creek
in Fishtoft, Lincolnshire, walking the dike
towards the Pilgrim Fathers Monument

An audience of cows

Vincent and Yours Truly at the Pilgrim Monument
The spire of St. Botolph's church can
be seen over the cabbage fields from Fishtoft


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire”:

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey":

Part 7 of this series "Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire":

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Fishtoft,  Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 17, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-fishtoft.html: accessed [access date]).